Untitled
n fact, the new cabin concept, called The Wedge, is so unique that Cavco agreed to build a prototype unit

POMONA, Calif. — Students at California State PolyTechnique University in Pomona have developed a new cabin design that has gotten the attention of California State Parks officials as well as Cavco Industries, one of the nation’s top producers of campground cabins.

In fact, the new cabin concept, called The Wedge, is so unique that Cavco agreed to build a prototype unit using the students’ designs and to transport it to Sacramento, where it will be featured at the California State Fair in Sacramento on July 11 to 27.

“We think The Wedge has a very innovative design that will capture people’s attention and stimulate their interest in cabins and in cabin camping,” said Tim Gage, Cavco’s national vice president of park models, cabins and specialty products for Cavco, which designs and builds fully furnished cabins for campgrounds across the country.

“California State Parks officials are very interested in The Wedge,” Gage said.

Unlike traditional cabins, The Wedge has a unique roof that sits at an almost perfect 90-degree angle. That’s not all that is different about The Wedge compared to a traditional cabin. It also incorporates various materials, including Western red cedar vertical siding, a composite porch deck and an ACX plywood interior for a more modern look. The small footprint cabin has a spacious porch as well as an inside area with a built in full size bed and twin bunk beds as well as custom made seating.

CalPoly students hope State Parks will embrace The Wedge and market it as a unique rental accommodation.

“Our students have come up with a design that could stimulate increase in cabin camping in public parks,” said Juintow Lin, an associate professor of architecture at CalPoly Pomona.

The students, she added, have been working with independent Parks Forward Commission, which has been tasked with creating proposals to address financial, operational and cultural issues facing the Department of Parks and Recreation. Commission co-chairman Lance Conn particularly wanted the panel to look at recreating the traditional cabin as a way to attract minorities and non-traditional campers to State Parks.


CalPoly College of Environmental Design Dean Michael Woo also serves on the Parks Forward Commission, and was asked to have CalPoly’s architecture students take the lead in designing the cabin in an effort to jumpstart interest among groups that are not typical campers.

“Our students frequently get to use their imaginations to solve design problems,” Woo says. “With this project, our students are not only using their imaginations, but also are making something which will change the way Californians perceive and use the great outdoors.”

Lin said her students designed more than 10 distinctively different cabins that had to meet certain conditions such as size, portability and a tight budget. The model called The Wedge was ultimately presented to Cavco for construction.

At least one model that the students worked on is expected to be placed in a state park, but CalPoly students and Parks Forward Commission officials hope is that it will prove so popular it will become the new standard for what camping looks like in California.

“These are designed with the intention of being very real structures eventually,” student Kevin Easterling said. “It’s on its way.”

This opportunity was provided to the architecture students in the fallout from the 2011 state budget crisis that included a threat of 70 parks being shuttered. The parks survived but it was learned later that the possibility of the closures was partly the result of senior officials in the state Department of Parks and Recreation hiding $54 million in two special funds. Park attendance has also dropped in recent years.

The independent Parks Forward Commission was tasked to create proposals to address financial, operational and cultural issues facing the Department of Parks and Recreation.

n fact, the new cabin concept, called The Wedge, is so unique that Cavco agreed to build a prototype unit

POMONA, Calif. — Students at California State PolyTechnique University in Pomona have developed a new cabin design that has gotten the attention of California State Parks officials as well as Cavco Industries, one of the nation’s top producers of campground cabins.

In fact, the new cabin concept, called The Wedge, is so unique that Cavco agreed to build a prototype unit using the students’ designs and to transport it to Sacramento, where it will be featured at the California State Fair in Sacramento on July 11 to 27.

“We think The Wedge has a very innovative design that will capture people’s attention and stimulate their interest in cabins and in cabin camping,” said Tim Gage, Cavco’s national vice president of park models, cabins and specialty products for Cavco, which designs and builds fully furnished cabins for campgrounds across the country.

“California State Parks officials are very interested in The Wedge,” Gage said.

Unlike traditional cabins, The Wedge has a unique roof that sits at an almost perfect 90-degree angle. That’s not all that is different about The Wedge compared to a traditional cabin. It also incorporates various materials, including Western red cedar vertical siding, a composite porch deck and an ACX plywood interior for a more modern look. The small footprint cabin has a spacious porch as well as an inside area with a built in full size bed and twin bunk beds as well as custom made seating.

CalPoly students hope State Parks will embrace The Wedge and market it as a unique rental accommodation.

“Our students have come up with a design that could stimulate increase in cabin camping in public parks,” said Juintow Lin, an associate professor of architecture at CalPoly Pomona.

The students, she added, have been working with independent Parks Forward Commission, which has been tasked with creating proposals to address financial, operational and cultural issues facing the Department of Parks and Recreation. Commission co-chairman Lance Conn particularly wanted the panel to look at recreating the traditional cabin as a way to attract minorities and non-traditional campers to State Parks.



CalPoly College of Environmental Design Dean Michael Woo also serves on the Parks Forward Commission, and was asked to have CalPoly’s architecture students take the lead in designing the cabin in an effort to jumpstart interest among groups that are not typical campers.

“Our students frequently get to use their imaginations to solve design problems,” Woo says. “With this project, our students are not only using their imaginations, but also are making something which will change the way Californians perceive and use the great outdoors.”

Lin said her students designed more than 10 distinctively different cabins that had to meet certain conditions such as size, portability and a tight budget. The model called The Wedge was ultimately presented to Cavco for construction.

At least one model that the students worked on is expected to be placed in a state park, but CalPoly students and Parks Forward Commission officials hope is that it will prove so popular it will become the new standard for what camping looks like in California.

“These are designed with the intention of being very real structures eventually,” student Kevin Easterling said. “It’s on its way.”

This opportunity was provided to the architecture students in the fallout from the 2011 state budget crisis that included a threat of 70 parks being shuttered. The parks survived but it was learned later that the possibility of the closures was partly the result of senior officials in the state Department of Parks and Recreation hiding $54 million in two special funds. Park attendance has also dropped in recent years.

The independent Parks Forward Commission was tasked to create proposals to address financial, operational and cultural issues facing the Department of Parks and Recreation.

militarymom:

Happy 1st Birthday to Little Michael Murphy McIntyre.. the next generation lives on to honor his name sake.

militarymom:

Happy 1st Birthday to Little Michael Murphy McIntyre.. the next generation lives on to honor his name sake.

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12 Shipping Container HOMES

Shipping containers meet a variety of requirements: Modern. Check. Low-cost. Check. Environmentally-friendly. Check. See twelve homes that make them work and check out our resources for shipping container builders and plans at the end of the article.

Above: Two shipping containers flank a taller common space in this residence designed by Studio H:T. The bedrooms are in the containers while the entry, dining, living, and a loft is in the center area. The project is planned to be off-the-grid using solar orientation, passive cooling, green roofs, pellet stove heating, and photovoltaics to create electricity.

Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture designed this orange container home for clients in San Jose, Costa Rica. The goal was to provide them with the spectacular views of the natural landscape. The roof between the two containers is made from the scrap metal.


Copenhagen-based architecture firm arcgency created the “WFH House” in Wuxi, China, out of three stacked shipping containers. Upcycled steel shipping containers were used for a steel frame, which was then clad with a sustainable bamboo facade. The home includes a rainwater collection system, solar cell-clad green roof, skylights, and permeable paving.

This structure, which was exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis is called the MDU, or Mobile Dwelling Unit, and was designed by Lot-EK. It is meant to travel with its dweller to long term destinations. When traveling, its sub-volumes are pushed in to fill the entire container, and then interlock so the container is left flush and can be shipped worldwide. When in use, the sub-volumes are pushed out, and its 500-square-foot interior is suitable for living and working.

Lot-EK also designed this 1,500-square-foot penthouse apartment in New York City. The project involved transforming a mechanical room and adding a bedroom with a patio on the roof. Pictured above is a yellow aluminum container that has been partially deconstructed to become an open outdoor space.

Photo by Jack Thompson

Note the white corrugated wall; that should tip you off that this is the interior of a shipping container home. In fact, this Houston residence is composed of three containers, to make a total of 1,538-square feet of living space. Architect Christopher Robertson of local firm Robertston Design says one of the goals was to make it feel like a typical home.

Poteet Architects, a firm known for its adaptive reuse of existing buildings, designed this 32-square-foot guest house in San Antonio, Texas using a shipping container. The interior is lined with bamboo plywood for the floor and the walls and the deck is made out of recycled soda bottles. It has a planted roof too.

The emerald green-accented Crossbox house in Brittany, France was designed by CG Architects. Two shipping containers are cantilevered above two more, and there’s a planted roof too. Like traditional setups, the bedrooms are on top and the living/dining spaces below.

Cove Park, located on 50-acres of Scotland’s west coast, is a community of established artists. In 2002, Container City created three cubes made of shipping containers to act as artist retreats, and another six were added in 2006.

This Adam Kalkin Container House in Califon, New Jersey, is three shipping containers wide by two shipping containers tall. Glass on two sides allows ample light to shine in, and the industrial materials continue throughout, with a concrete floor and steel beams and columns. Rustic fir flooring and mahogany closing doors ensures it works in its wooded surroundings.

This perfectly simple, wood clad, absolutely horizontal 40-foot cargo container house sits on a flat site in the Galician countryside of Spain. Its porch and removable awning allow for outdoor enjoyment, which is ideal since it’s a summer house. It was designed by architects Severo Fernández and Basilio Rodríguez of Estudio Base.

I thought you might like this 64 sq. ft. micro cabin that is actually used as a sauna.

Yes, a sauna, but in Finland and other places in Europe having a sauna outside is a social thing.

The architects designed it for a client who wanted it during the winter months because it’s great after a sweaty run or after jumping in icy cold lake water. Plus it’s small enough that it can be moved on a sledge.

I’m thinking this would make a great private space for reading/writing/meditation? But if designed right, this micro cabin could even make the perfect tiny living space. Let’s take a look.

I thought you might like this 64 sq. ft. micro cabin that is actually used as a sauna.

Yes, a sauna, but in Finland and other places in Europe having a sauna outside is a social thing.

The architects designed it for a client who wanted it during the winter months because it’s great after a sweaty run or after jumping in icy cold lake water. Plus it’s small enough that it can be moved on a sledge.

I’m thinking this would make a great private space for reading/writing/meditation? But if designed right, this micro cabin could even make the perfect tiny living space. Let’s take a look.

Dream tiny RV House 

This unit would be a blast to tour the US for a season.

Dream tiny RV House

This unit would be a blast to tour the US for a season.

resplend3nt-rap4cious:

tension312:

From imgfave.com

V@mpi-Baby Angie 🍭

resplend3nt-rap4cious:

tension312:

From imgfave.com

V@mpi-Baby Angie 🍭

Kanga Cottage in South Texas